The Vengeance of Peenemünd

The Vengeance of Peenemünd

Towards the end of the Second World War, Nazi scientists developed a series of futuristic weapons to use against England aimed to bring the British people to their knees.  Named Vengeance weapons, their presence in the skies over London was another German threat that had to be dealt with.

A German Luftwaffe Heinkel He 111 H-22. This version could carry FZG 76 (V1) flying bombs, but only a few aircraft were produced in 1944. Some were used by bomb wing KG 3.

 

A cutaway of the V1 created for the USAF.

 

An image of a Spitfire using its wing to turn over a V1 flying bomb.

 

A recreation of a V1 launch ramp on display at Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 

Images shown under a Creative Commons licence with thanks to Nick D, the Imperial War Museum, the Bundesarchiv and the US Gov USAF Museum.

All Blood Runs Red

All Blood Runs Red

President of France, Charles de Gaulle is on a state visit to the United States of America and he asks to meet a French hero who holds the Légion d’honneur and who lives in New York.  Eventually, retired lift operator is found and brought to the President.  The man is Eugene Jacques Bullard and is almost unknown in the country of his birth but he holds a remarkable place in the history of aviation.

Bullard in his Corporal’s uniform during the WW1.

 

Bullard in 1917 beside a Nieuport while with Escadrille 93.

 

Bullard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Paris, 1954.

 

Title image by APG listener Jonathan Alexandratos who lives near Flushing Meadows cemetery and who took the time to visit the grave of Eugene Bullard which can be found in Section C.

Other images under Creative Commons licence with thanks to Sus scrofa, Wikimedia Commons, US Gov USAF.

Happy Bottom Riding Club

Happy Bottom Riding Club

Watch the movie ‘The Right Stuf’ and you will see, portrayed, a desert bar near Edwards Air Force Base where a generation of great Test Pilots drank whisky and bantered with the bargirl.  The lady was Pancho Barnes and she was much more than a bargirl!

Pancho and her Travel Air type R Mystery Ship.

 

Barnes in 1928, the image used on her pilot’s license!

 

Pancho serving at the Happy Bottom Riding Club.

 

Images under Creative Commons licence; with thanks to the San Diego Air and Space Museum Archives and the Pancho Barnes Trust Estate Archive.

Flowers on the Waves

Flowers on the Waves

The loss of Swissair Flight 111 in the most appalling circumstances wasn’t just a tragedy for those onboard and their loved ones, but for a whole community of people in the quiet town of Halifax and even more so for the folk near Peggy’s Cove in Nova Scotia.

The memorial at Peggy’s Cove.

 

Images under Creative Commons licence, by Aero Icarus and Aconcagua.

RAF Form 414 – The Logbook

RAF Form 414 – The Logbook

Every document or book within the Royal Air Force has a Form number.  One of the most precious to a pilot is Form 414, the PILOTS FLYING LOG BOOK.  Inside is a record of every flight a pilot undertakes.  Looking back through a log book brings back many memories.  These are a few of mine.

Talk to Me

Talk to Me

In the world of aviation, accurate communication is vital and when it breaks down the results can be catastrophic.  In poor weather, the crew of an Avianca 707 struggle to land at New York’s JFK airport.

 

An Avianca B707.

 

Images under Creative Commons licence, with thanks to Felix Goetting, Veggies and the NTSB.